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Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23 (some duplicates have been removed)
. >> reporter: china remains a major competitor for u.s. companies. our trade deficit with china hit a record $315 billion last year. separately, china reported it's exports grew 25% over a year ago, easily beating expectations. the robust growth was attributed to aggressive new lending by chinese banks. >> just a few months ago, the chinese economy was in contraction. we've seen really two or three months where we are seeing much stronger growth in china and that's increasing the demand for goods there. >> reporter: but analysts say the news from china may have been somewhat distorted by statistical quirks and the start of the chinese new year. looking at a few months of data shows the big story in china is one of moderate, but solid growth. >> they're not falng apart. growth is going to hold in the range of 7% to 8%. but this is not going to go back to 10% either. there's no signs of that. it looks like its a more permanent, but controllable slow down. >> reporter: china remains strong in assembling and processing goods like iphones that are then exported by foreign companies. when economis
years of slow progression. and china is still growing, single-digit levels of growth. brazil is still growing, and russia is still growing. india, which is the fourth of the brick countries, should have a better track in 2014. >> susie: depending which country you're talking about, we've seen investors pouring a lot of money into international equity funds since january. so can they expect to get a good return on international investing in 2013? >> susie, it is going to come down to everybody's timeframe. we are a culture that wants it now. we've been through a lot of problems recently that make people very risk adverse. if you have the patience to sit through volatility, buying emerging markets is a good investment now. however, if you still feel burned by what happened in 2007 and 2008, and are worried that a 10% pullback or a 15% pullback would make you change your approach, be very careful and buying emerging markets. we've had a great run since november and i would counsel some caution. >> susie: you are advising your clients to put their money mostly in u.s. stocks over internat
it's global marketes, for example, the china index, the fxi, which is another e.t.f., is down about .6% this year with the s & p 500 up somewhere around 6% or 7%, and the morgan stanley world index up about 5.5%. so these have lagged recently, and with the end of the chinese lunar new year, this weekend, the chinese market is going to reopen next week. and we're likely to see some reaction to the better economic statistics that have been coming out during this lunar period. >> tom: you mentioned fxi, that was one of your picks back in janet last time we had you on this program july 27, up better than 18%. now performance there. in the meantime you also lukd the technology exchange traded fund, which supby about 2%. would you put any new money to work or take any money off the table withthese? >> well, we are adding to the fxi, the china index. and, clearly, with the kind of growth we're likely to see tepid growth in the u.s., until some of the headwinds we face abate. technology is an area where potentially there is significant growth in excess of the g.d.p. we're going to see. we c
's hope for a rebound this year. at the same time economic data from china and europe has been improving, all of which could boost global energy demand. triple-a predicts prices at the pump will keep climbing, topping out somewhere between $3.60 and $3.80 a gallon this spring. but traders say if you want a quick way to know where prices are headed, watch the stock market: >> oil prices look at equity market as a proxy for demand, or future demand. we are at 14,000 in the dow, no coincidence that we are at the highs of the energy market as well. >> reporter: and the higher price of gasoline comes as workers have less take-home pay, because of the expiration of a payroll tax holiday. so will consumers be forced to cut back spending, hurting economic growth, and stock market performance? >> not necessarily, because rising gasoline prices is usually predicated on a weaker dollar or better economic activity. better economic activity would lead to higher earnings. >> reporter: wolfberg says crude prices would have to jump $10 a barrel, or roughly 10%, before there's a major hit to the u.s. eco
by wpbt captioned by media access group at wgbh access.wgbh.org did stocks fell on worries that china might... announcer: the new pbs for ipad app. you'll never know what you'll find. [dog barks] announcer: available now in the app store.
Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23 (some duplicates have been removed)

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